Closing the gap…

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I gave my second I-Check (a.k.a. quiz) this week, and the scores were much better for most classes.  What was interesting and a little disturbing was that the range was smaller; my lowest-performing students improved quite a bit, but my highest-performing students in many cases did worse.  I will have to look at the patterns in their scores and try to figure out what is behind this.  Still, getting those lowest kids up is something to celebrate.  A lot of their improvement came in line graphing and interpretation of graphs, a skill that most of my higher-performing students had already mastered.  So that could explain why the bottom rose but the top didn’t move – but it doesn’t explain why the top actually dropped!

But the really good news is that the CTT class has almost completely caught up with the other classes.  Nearly every student in that class made significant gains, and their class average improved by more than 10 points.  They didn’t meet their class goal, but many met their individual goals.  And their class average was only a point or two below the other classes, not really significant.  Whoo-hoo!

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3 Comments

Filed under science, special education, teaching

3 responses to “Closing the gap…

  1. A lot of their improvement came in line graphing and interpretation of graphs, a skill that most of my higher-performing students had already mastered. So that could explain why the bottom rose but the top didn’t move – but it doesn’t explain why the top actually dropped!

    It could be that they are getting bored and careless. 😦

    Congrats on getting your low kids up there, and your CTT class caught up.

    If you are practicing skills that your top kids have already mastered, do you give them something else challenging to work on instead?

  2. ms. v

    Careless, yes… bored, maybe a little but not that much. We haven’t been reviewing those skills by doing worksheets or something similarly rote; it was all integrated into a group project that provided plenty of room for each student’s skills to be used in different ways. And in most groups it wasn’t like the top kids were “carrying” the rest of the group, for most it was a real collaboration with everyone learning a lot about public speaking and so forth.

    My hunch is that I didn’t spend quite enough time on one or two of the new skills, because they seemed easy and the FOSS lessons went really fast, and didn’t realize that the kids hadn’t fully grasped the new stuff – so that cost everyone, including my top kids, some points, while the lower kids gained in other areas. But I need to check.

  3. wow, congratulations! you are really doing a great job with them to see that kind of improvement. yay!

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